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A labourer drinks water while harvesting wheat crop at a field in Jhanpur village of the northern Indian state of Punjab on April 18, 2012. REUTERS/Ajay Verma

Researchers to track adaptation finance for poorest

By Megan Rowling | 6 December 2012

(AlertNet) – A new initiative to track funding for climate change adaptation aims to work out whether the money is meeting the needs of vulnerable people in climate-hit communities, aid and research groups say.

Launched on the sidelines of U.N. climate talks in Doha by Oxfam, the London-based Overseas Development Institute and the Washington-based World Resources Institute, the programme will monitor how climate aid flows from the international level down to local communities, as part of an effort to improve its transparency and accountability.

“It is crucial that the people who are benefiting from climate finance have a say in how the money is spent, so that it can best serve their efforts to adapt to climate change,” said the World Resource Institute’s  (WRI) Heather McGray.

The initiative will work with local civil society groups for an initial two-year period in Nepal, the Philippines, Uganda and Zambia, and share lessons through alliances across Africa and Asia, the groups said.

Zambia and the Philippines are both setting up trust funds for climate finance, which should help channel funds to local projects, and Nepal has a government directive that 80 percent of climate funds should go to communities, according to Oxfam America’s David Waskow .

“We believe this initiative can enable developing countries to establish efficient and effective systems that deliver funds to the most vulnerable. Accountability and transparency are key ingredients in ensuring sustainable finance,” Anthony Wolimbwa of Climate Action Network Uganda said in a statement.

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Climate and Energy

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